Minnesota Nursing magazine

From the Dean

True team-based care

Connie DelaneyDear Friends and Colleagues:

When the Institute of Medicine released the Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health report in 2010, it gave voice to many who recognized the central role nursing plays in transforming health care. In December 2015, Assessing Progress on the IOM Report The Future of Nursing was released and illustrates how far we have come together in just five years.

The report’s initial recommendations became the springboard for strategic initiatives across the country. By articulating how nurses can contribute more fully to the triple aim of a better patient experience, improved outcomes and lower costs, the recommendations provided a road map for future-oriented schools and systems.

In Minnesota we advanced the recommendations on many fronts. Two examples:

  • Removing scope of practice barriers: Minnesota became the 19th state to grant advanced practice nurses the authority to practice to the full scope of their education and license. The change facilitated the opening of the University of Minnesota’s first nurse-led primary care clinic.
  • Doubling the number of doctorallyprepared nurses: Anticipating future health needs, the school replaced its Master of Science in Nursing program with the Doctor of Nursing Practice program in 2007. Now ours is the largest DNP program with an on-campus component in the country with more than 350 students.

"Most insightful, I believe, is the call to broaden the base for support of true team-based care. The concept of interprofessional care is not new; however, our approach and presumptions as nurses deserve a fresh look."

We celebrate the progress that is well documented in the 2015 IOM progress report. Perhaps even more compelling than the progress over the past five years are the latest challenges posed to us in the 2015 report. This distinguished progress report committee advises the nursing community to generate better nursing workforce data and make diversity and cultural competence top priorities.

Most insightful, I believe, is the call to broaden the base for support of true team-based care. The concept of interprofessional care is not new; however, our approach and presumptions as nurses deserve a fresh look.

Let ours not be a nursing revolution, but rather a patient care revolution. We would be wise to let go of old hierarchical perceptions and boldly assume our seat at the table. We must intensify our strategies to reach out to physicians, pharmacists, administrators, dental professionals, policy makers and other colleagues as true partners with the patient in charge and at the center.

Thank you to so many who have advanced the agenda, particularly the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. With progress underway and more barriers removed, it’s our call to courageous action and unbending expectations for the best for patients, families and communities.

Connie W. Delaney
Professor and Dean

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