Linet Nyangau

Doctor of Nursing Practice

Linet Nyangau“In the future, I see myself directly involved in promoting and providing health care and choices to women – focusing mostly on disadvantaged girls, women and their families in developing countries.”

While growing up in Kenya, Linet Nyangau’s grandmother would use natural remedies to treat ailments, while her mother, a nurse, relied only on hospitals and conventional medication. Having briefly pursued a career in accounting, Nyangau changed her course because she felt it was her duty to provide quality health care, particularly for women. Though she moved to America more than ten years ago, she carried these formative experiences with her.

Nyangau is a student in the Women’s Health Nurse Practitioner specialty of the Doctor of Nursing Practice program.

Her childhood in Kenya exposed her to a society facing diseases like malaria, and TB-HIV co-infection and a significant population that prefer natural cures using tree leaves, roots, and soil. These situations taught her the importance of listening carefully to people and understanding their belief systems. Quality health care, she says, includes quality communication. “It has been with me since I was a child to find my way into being part of the solution, be it to eradicate hunger and incurable diseases on one end or encouraging healthy lifestyles on the other end.”

Nyangau is enrolled in the program while working full time as a Registered Nurse at Hennepin County Medical Center, where she floats to different units doing everything from developing patient care plans to emergency response and supervising nursing assistants. She particularly enjoys being an advocate for her patients and being their contact for all involved in their recovery process.

Because the DNP in women’s health program is delivered partially on line, Nyangua says she is able to balance work, school and caring for her two boys, ages 8 and 10. “The online option affords me the opportunity to work on my homework at home while helping the boys work on their school assignments,” she said.

Upon completing the DNP program, she looks forward to caring for women as an advanced practice nurse. Once her sons are on their own or in college, she imagines starting or working for a women’s health clinic in the U.S. or in a developing country, providing primary and advanced care.

“In the future,” she said, “I see myself directly involved in promoting and providing health care and choices to women – focusing mostly on disadvantaged girls, women and their families in developing countries.”


Learn about our DNP program.